Archive for April 2013

Vaccination for German Measles before Pregnancy

Vaccination for German Measles before Pregnancy

Most women think they no longer need vaccination against German Measles (Rubella) since they most likely were vaccinated against it when they were young.  Bad news is even if you were vaccinated at school, studies show that immunity against the virus may not last as long as previously thought.  The effects of the vaccines can wear off over a long period of time.

For this reason, most women of child bearing age should double check their immunity against German Measles before getting pregnant.  If the rubella immunity test shows that you are not immune to the virus, better have yourself vaccinated at least a month before trying to get pregnant.  You cannot and should not have the rubella vaccine while pregnant since the vaccine contains a live virus which could cause rubella infection to your baby.

German measles or Rubella can cause stillbirth, miscarriage or birth defects (congenital rubella syndrome) such as hearing loss, brain damage, hear defects and cataracts for your unborn baby specially if you catch it during the first 4 months (16 weeks) of pregnancy.

Resources:
http://www.welcomebabyhome.com
http://www.nhs.uk

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Flu Vaccine Effectiveness Report

Flu Vaccine Effectiveness Report

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention conducts studies each year to estimate how well the flu vaccine protects people from getting sick against the Influenza virus.  This is called vaccine effectiveness (VE) and is largely based on the information that the CDC is able to collect during the flu season.

According to the CDC, effectiveness against flu A (H3N2) virus (the main virus spreading this season) is estimated to be 47%, while effectiveness against flu B was 67% for all ages. “This indicates that vaccination with the 2012-2013 flu season vaccine reduced the risk of flu-associated medical visits from flu A (H3N2) viruses by one half and from flu B viruses by two-thirds for most of the population.” However, the CDC notes that the exception to the results was the effectiveness of the flu vaccine against flu A (H3N2) viruses among people aged 65 years and older which was lower at 9%.

Overall, the CDC says that vaccine effectiveness estimates are within the range expected during flu seasons.

Resources:
http://www.cdc.gov

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